Spiritual Amnesia

Has it ever seemed like things are going really well in your relationship with God one day, and then almost the next day you’re spiritually in the dumps? Maybe your quiet times are going great and the Bible is really challenging you and speaking to you, and then the next thing you know it’s hard to even focus on what you’re reading. If you’ve been a Christian for longer than a year, this has likely happened to you. Like any relationship, the Christian life is full of ups and downs.

I was actually thinking about this earlier today. I decided to dub it “spiritual amnesia.” Spiritual amnesia is where, for whatever reason, you just forget who you are and, more importantly, whose you are. Why is it so easy for us to forget that we are redeemed people? We are holy and righteous. First Peter 2:9 tells us that we are the people of God and we are to worship Him. But sometimes we forget…

This has happened for thousands of years to many heroes of the faith. For example, Abraham is considered the father of faith (Gal 3:7) but he suffered from spiritual amnesia. In Genesis 12:1-3 God promises to make Abram a great nation. Abram then starts his journey of faith with God, he’s protected from Pharaoh (Gen 12:17), he rescues his brother, Lot (Gen 14:16), but pretty soon Abram doubts God. In Gen 15:2-3, the father of faith wavers in his faith. Sounds like Abram had a case of spiritual amnesia.

Another example is found in 1 Kings 18. In 1 Kings 18:38-39, Elijah witnesses God defeat Baal by sending fire to consume wood. Then God ends a multi-year drought (1 Kings 18:45) and then empowers Elijah to outrun a chariot (1 Kings 18:46). Then in Ch 19, THE VERY NEXT CHAPTER, Elijah hears that Jezebel wants to kill him, so he goes into despair and asks God to kill him (1 Kings 19:3-4). After going toe-to-toe with all the Baal prophets and seeing God win, Elijah is then afraid of one person. He was certainly suffering from spiritual amnesia.

Another example comes from John. In the John 6:10-11, Jesus feeds five thousand people. Later that night he walks across the sea to Capernaum (Jn 6:19). The crowd follows him and then in Jn 6:30-31 they ask him for a sign saying, “Our fathers ate manna from Heaven.” They seem to have forgotten that just yesterday Jesus had fed five thousand people bread… from Heaven! This is also a clear case of spiritual amnesia!

There are plenty of other examples of this behavior. In the book of judges, it happens repeatedly (Judges 2:19)! It seems like a common pattern for people in the Bible to forget about God. Sadly, I see this pattern in my own life too… So how do we “fix” it? Is there a cure?

I don’t know.

I think the only thing we can do is continually seek the face of God. The more time we spend with God, the more we will remember. Often I feel like the person described in James 1:24 who just can’t seem to remember who he is. As soon as I stop reading my Bible I forget that I’m a son of God. I forget that I have the Holy Spirit inside of me. I forget that I’ve been given everything I need to live a life that will please and glorify God. I forget.

But James 1:25 tells us we must look intently. There must be a purposeful, consistent, persistent gazing. We must have a pursuit of God. Too often, Christianity is portrayed as a once time event. Like turning 18. Once you turn 18, you’ll always be 18 without ever having to try or do anything else. Becoming a Christian is a lot more different. Becoming a Christian is about beginning a lifelong relationship. Being a Christian is a lot like being in love. We must pursue God, just like he pursued us. Being a Christian means responding to what God has already done.

Perhaps if we focus on what God has done we won’t be so quick to develop spiritual amnesia.

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Grieve with hope

God never promised that life would be easy. In fact, Jesus promises pretty much the opposite in John 16:33. Jesus says we will have trouble. Life is full of pain, grief, and sorrow. These emotions are all part of the human experience. They’re a part of who we are and how we experience this fallen, broken world. Ecclesiastes 3:1 reassures us that this is normal. There are times and seasons for everything.

Specifically, Ecclesiastes 3:4 tells us that there are times to mourn. There are times for sorrow; but there are also times to celebrate. Life is a paradox. One of my favorite quotes comes from the character Brian in Vanilla Sky, he says, “Just remember, the sweet is never as sweet without the sour, and I know the sour…”

I think life is a lot like that. It takes the sour to appreciate the sweet. It takes death to appreciate life. And it’s okay to mourn when people die. In fact, it’s Biblical. Look at the Psalms. Sixty-seven psalms are regarded as lament psalms either wholly or in part. Sixty-one are laments in their entirety. To me, one of the saddest Psalms, is Psalm 88. Look at Psalm 88:14, 16, 18. Those verses are tragic. Yet in Psalm 88:1 the Psalmist refers to God as “the God who saves me.”

After Job lost everything, he went into a deep state of sorrow. In Job 2:13, his friends show up and just sit there with him for a whole week. No one says anything; they’re just there for him, supporting him, comforting him.

Even Jesus, in Mark 14:34 says that his “soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death.” Even Jesus! Arguably the shortest verse in the Bible (depending on what translation you use) is John 11:35 where the text says that “Jesus wept.” If Jesus can mourn, so can we. If Jesus can feel despair, so can we. It’s okay.

It’s not a sin to feel sorrow, despair, or depression (although it can be easy to sin while feel like this). The problem comes when we try to hide our emotions from God; or when we try to “sterilize” our prayers. Many of the Psalms are full of questions to God. Questions like, “How long, O LORD, how long?” (Psalm 6:3), or “Why have you rejected us forever, O God?” (Psalm74:1). Those are just two examples but there are dozens of others.

My point is simply this, when time are hard and we feel pain, we need to be honest with God. We need to bring our pain to Him and lean on Him for strength. Psalm 142:1-2 talks about being open and honest with God. Psalm 143:1 asks God to listen, with verse 10 asking for guidance. And Psalm 144:1-2 gives praise to God calling Him our fortress, stronghold, deliverer, and shield.We need to admit that we don’t understand the world but that we trust in someone who does. God is in charge and it’s not our place to know all the answers to life’s questions.

The good news is that we have hope; if not in this life, then certainly in the next. God will be victorious and He will be glorified. Although most of the Psalms are lament psalms, read the last one, Psalm 150:6 is the last verse in the book of Psalms and it simply says, “Let everything that has breath praise the LORD. Praise the LORD.”

God also promises that he will be with us during hard times. One of my all-time favorite Bible verses is 1 Peter 5:10. While it does promise that we may suffer for “a little while” it also promises that God Himself will restore us and make us “strong, firm, and steadfast.”

To him be the power for ever and ever. Amen (1 Peter 5:11).

Name Calling!

(Note: This post was actually written by Kalob, but when we transitioned to our new blog it imported under Daniel’s name. Odd, right?)


It is interesting to see how great our God is to us, even though we often go against His will. Even when we are walking so close with God, one bad judgement call can easily bring us out of fellowship with him. Additionally, it is astonishing to see how when we finally submit to God’s will and put him in charge, He forgets the past and looks ahead to the future in store for you!



(Genesis 15-17) Abram has already obeyed God by leaving behind the only home he has ever known. He has also seen God multiply his wealth (livestock, silver, & gold) Gen 13:2. He finally arrives at where God has called him and God promises Abram children. God takes him outside and tells Abram to look at the stars and tells him that will be the number of his offspring (Gen 15:5). At this point in time Abram is 86 years old!

As we read more into Genesis chapter 16 we see Abram decides he can’t wait any longer and his wife Sarai offers her servant, Hagar, to Abram that she might give him an heir. Abram goes out of the will of God and has a child with Hagar. All of this is against what God said to him about multiplying his seed through his wife.

(Genesis 17) Thirteen years go by and God doesn’t say anything to Abram. When Abram was 99 years old God appeared to him and the first thing Abram does is fall on his face in submission (Gen 17:3) Once he finally submits, God says your new name will be Abraham (Gen 17:5). God changes Abram’s name as a symbol of His forgiveness! Later on we learn that God allows Abraham to have a child with his wife, whose name is also changed to Sarah (Gen 17:15-16)

Another favorite example is Jacob. (Genesis 27)
Jacob deceives his father Isaac (who is old and blind in bed). He receives his father’s blessing by dressing up and acting like his brother Esau. Later on we see Jacob wrestling with God on a trip. He wrestles with God all night and when daybreak comes Jacob basically begs God to bless him. He then asks Jacob what his name is and he finally says Jacob. God then immediately says you are now called Israel. Then God blesses Israel. (Gen 32:32) Once again, God is showing that He is forgiving him for sinning against Him and he is a new person that God can bless and work with!



Are you trying to complete things as Abram was? Things that seem impossible because of your age, intellect, gender, or faith? Phil 4:13 says you can do all things through Christ! Submit to God and be amazed at the things He has in store for you. It might not be just your life depending on it; it might be someone who doesn’t know about the Gospel! Let God change your name and become a new creation. Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old has gone, the new has come!

Is God trying to call you a different name but you’re not letting Him?

-Kalob Hinners